Bills
for Collection

One of the most commonly used methods of obtaining payment in international trade transactions is the collection of drafts drawn by the seller (shipper) on the buyer (importer)

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Bills for Collection

One of the most commonly used methods of obtaining payment in international trade transactions is the collection of drafts drawn by the seller (shipper) on the buyer (importer).

Basically the goods are shipped by the seller to the buyer, without any guarantees of payment. The seller's draft and documents covering the shipment are sent by the seller's bank (Remitting Bank) to the buyer's bank (Collecting/Presenting Bank) to obtain payment and/or acceptance to pay at a certain determinable date.
 

The seller's bank forwards the draft and documents to the buyer's bank with instructions that the documents may be delivered to the buyer only upon the buyer's payment of the draft (commonly described as "documents against payment," "cash against documents," or just "D/P".

Seller draws a draft on the buyer payable a certain number of days after sight or after the date of draft, invoice, or transport document. The draft and documents are delivered to the buyer's bank (Collecting/Presenting Bank) with instructions to deliver documents against acceptance to pay at a future date. The buyer's bank will obtain the buyer's signed acceptance on the face of the draft before delivering the documents to the buyer; the draft is equivalent to a promissory note, with a fixed amount and maturity. At maturity, the buyer's bank (Access Bank) will attempt to collect payment of the accepted draft.